Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is an area (or areas) of abnormal cell growth that increases a person’s risk of developing invasive breast. Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is an incidental microscopic finding with characteristic cellular morphology and multifocal tissue patterns. The condition is a. Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) represents the next step up from atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH) along the malignant spectrum of lobular breast carcinoma.

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Lobular carcinoma in situ LCIS develops in a milk-producing gland lobule and does not spread into nearby breast tissue. Lobular carcinoma in situ LCIS is an uncommon condition in which abnormal cells form in the milk glands lobules in the breast. But lobulillag diagnosed with LCIS indicates that you have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. LCIS usually doesn’t show up on mammograms.

The condition is most often discovered as a result of a breast biopsy done for another reason, such as a suspicious breast lump or an abnormal mammogram.

Women with LCIS have an increased risk of developing invasive breast cancer in either breast. If you’re diagnosed with LCIS, your doctor may recommend increased breast cancer screening and may ask you to consider medical treatments to reduce your risk of developing invasive breast cancer.

LCIS doesn’t cause signs or symptoms. Rather, your doctor might discover incidentally that you have LCIS — for instance, after a biopsy to assess a breast lump or an abnormal area found on a mammogram. Make an appointment with your doctor if you notice a change in your breasts, such as a aitu, an area of puckered or otherwise unusual skin, a thickened region under the skin, or nipple discharge. Ask your doctor when you should consider breast cancer screening carcinnoma how often it should be repeated.

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Most groups recommend considering routine breast cancer screening beginning in your 40s. Talk with your doctor about what’s right for you. Each breast contains 15 to 20 lobes of glandular tissue, arranged like the petals of a daisy. The lobes are further divided into smaller lobules that produce milk for breast-feeding. Small tubes ducts conduct the milk to a reservoir that lies just beneath your nipple.

It’s not clear what causes LCIS. LCIS begins when cells in a milk-producing gland lobule of a breast develop genetic mutations that cause the cells to appear abnormal. The abnormal cells remain in the lobule and don’t extend into, or invade, nearby breast tissue.

Lobular Carcinoma In Situ (LCIS)

If LCIS is detected in a breast biopsy, it doesn’t mean that you have cancer. But having LCIS increases your risk of breast cancer and makes it more likely that you may develop invasive breast cancer. The risk of breast cancer in women carcinoam with LCIS is thought to be approximately 20 percent. Put another way, for every women diagnosed with LCIS, 20 will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 80 won’t be diagnosed with breast cancer.

The risk of developing breast cancer for women in general is thought to be 12 percent. Put another way, for every women in the general population, 12 will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Your individual risk of breast cancer is based on many factors.

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Talk to your doctor to better understand your personal risk of breast cancer. Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission. This content does not have an English version. This content does not have an Arabic version. Lobular carcinoma in situ Lobular carcinoma in situ LCIS develops in a milk-producing gland lobule and does not spread into nearby breast tissue. Breast anatomy Each breast contains 15 to 20 lobes of glandular tissue, arranged like the petals of a daisy.

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LCIS lobular carcinoma in situ – Moose and Doc

References Niederhuber JE, et al. Cancer of the breast. Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; Accessed April 20, National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Benign breast disease adult. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; Wen HY, et al. Lobular carcinoma in situ. Townsend CM Jr, et al.

Lobular Carcinoma In Situ (LCIS)

Diseases of the breast. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: Accessed April 25, Pruthi S expert opinion. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Mayo Clinic Marketplace Check out these best-sellers and special offers on books and newsletters from Mayo Clinic.